Quiterajo

MOZTIPA021
Quiterajo

Country: Mozambique

Administrative region: Cabo Delgado (Province)

Central co-ordinates: 11.7645 S, 40.39660 E

Area: 129km²

Qualifying IPA Criteria

A(i)Site contains one or more globally threatened species, A(iv)Site contains one or more range restricted endemic species that are potentially threatened, B(ii)Site contains an exceptional number of species of high conservation importance, C(iii)Site contains nationally threatened or restricted habitat or vegetation types, AND/OR habitats that have severely declined in extent nationally

IPA assessment rationale

Quiterajo meets all three of the criteria to qualify as an IPA. Under criterion A(i), it holds nationally and, in most cases, internationally important populations of over 30 globally threatened plant species, 11 of which are assessed as Endangered and three which are Critically Endangered: Memecylon aenigmaticum, Warneckea albiflora and W. cordiformis which are all endemic to this site. Other globally threatened species are likely to be added to this list when a full Red List for the region is finalised and when the potentially new species are delimited. The site contains at least 21 qualifying species under criterion B(ii) and hence exceeds the 3% threshold for this criterion. It also holds nationally important areas of Rovuma coastal dry forest, a nationally (and almost certainly globally) threatened habitat, and Quiterajo is considered to be one of the five best sites nationally for this habitat, hence it qualifies under criterion C(iii).

Site description

The Quiterajo IPA covers an area of 129 km2 inland from the coastal village of Quiterajo in Macomia District of Cabo Delgado Province. It lies to the west of highway 247, ca. 45 km south of the port of Mocimboa da Praia. The site primarily covers dry forest and dense woodland that occupy a low plateau (mainly 90-150 m a.s.l.) to the south of the floodplain of the Messalo River. The main, eastern, block of the IPA contains the ca. 31 km2 Namacubi Forest, sometimes referred to as "The Banana" Forest because of its shape. Also included are the forests and woodlands around and west of Lake Macungue which are separated from Namacubi by floodplain grasslands, open palm savanna and seasonal wetlands, and the Namparamnera Forest to the south of Namacubi. These forests are home to a rich flora including many globally rare and threatened species, and this site must be considered an urgent priority for conservation action. Indeed, the Namacubi Forest is of such high botanical importance that the major publication on the Trees and Shrubs of Mozambique (Burrows et al. 2018) was dedicated to this site in the hope that it would promote international recognition and formal conservation of this unique site.
This IPA could be expanded in the future to include the heavily wooded and forested areas of the Sakaje Plateau to the southwest of the current site. To our knowledge, this area has not yet been botanised, but the vegetation is largely intact and looks similar in composition to some of the important patches of woody vegetation at Quiterajo. This would add an extra c. 200 km2 to the IPA, or the Sakaje Plateau could be recognised as a separate IPA.

Botanical significance

Quiterajo was listed as one of four "high priority" sites for the conservation of coastal dry forest in northeast Mozambique (Timberlake et al. 2010). This site contains globally important examples of intact dry forest of the proposed Rovuma Centre of Plant Endemism (CoE), a threatened habitat type known for its high rates of local endemism and high species turnover between patches (Timberlake et al. 2010, 2011; Burrows & Timberlake 2011; Darbyshire et al. 2019). The c. 31 km2 Namacubi Forest is dominated by Guibourtia schliebenii, a globally Vulnerable species for which this is believed to be one of the most important sites. It contains a significant number of species not known elsewhere in Mozambique, many of which are rare and/or threatened Rovuma CoE endemics, such as Drypetes sclerophylla (EN), Omphalea mansfeldiana (EN) and Xylopia tenuipetala (EN). The lattermost of these is a Mozambican endemic for which this is the most important site globally. The aroid Stylochaeton tortispathum (VU) is currently considered to be endemic to Namacubi. The diversity of woody Melastomataceae is particularly impressive; Namacubi contains two endemic species, Warneckea albiflora (CR) and Warneckea cordiformis (CR), as well as being the only Mozambican site for Memecylon rovumense (EN), otherwise known from three sites in southeast Tanzania, and the prime locality for the Mozambican endemic species Memecylon torrei (EN). The adjacent Namparamnera Forest is the only known locality for Memecylon aenigmaticum (CR). The sacred forest west of Lake Macungue is dominated by Micklethwaitia carvalhoi, a globally Vulnerable Mozambican endemic species and genus, with c. 5,000 individuals present in an area of approximately 1 km2. Whilst the surrounding floodplain grasslands and seasonal wetlands are of lesser botanical importance, this is the only Mozambican site for the rare labiate herb Orthosiphon scedastophyllus (CR), otherwise known from Tendaguru in Tanzania.
Several undescribed taxa are known from Quiterajo, some of which are potentially further endemic species. These include a new Asparagus sp. currently under description by S.M. and J.E. Burrows (to be named Asparagus inopinatus); a possible new species of succulent Euphorbia allied to E. ambroseae; a species of Vepris also known from one site in Zambézia Province; Deinbollia sp. A of Burrows et al. (2018); and several members of the coffee (Rubiaceae) family: a Coffea sp.; two species of Pyrostria currently under description; Tarenna sp. 53 of Degreef (2006), also known from the Rondo Plateau in Tanzania and Mueda Plateau [MOZTIPA025]; and Rytigynia sp. M of Burrows et al. (2018).

Habitat and geology

The low plateau above the Messalo floodplain, capped by dry forest, is composed of iron-rich sandstones of the Mikindani Formation of mid-Neogene origin (c. 10 – 15 mya). This rock gives rise to a coarsely sandy well-drained red soil. A 50 x 50 m plot surveyed in the Namacubi Forest (Timberlake et al. 2010) revealed that 50 – 60% of the canopy is dominated by Guibourtia schliebenii. Other common species in the canopy and subcanopy include Manilkara discolor, Rinorea angustifolia, Terminalia myrtifolia, Xylopia tenuipetala and a range of woody Melastomataceae, notably Memecylon torrei, Warneckea cordiformis and W. sansibarica. Lannea antiscorbutica and Vitex carvalhi are important emergent trees. Timberlake et al. (2010) estimate a richness of c. 50 – 60 woody species per ha. The geology underlying the Micklethwaitia-dominated dry forest west of Lake Macungue is not known but it may differ from that of Namacubi given that it has a very different species assemblage.
The forests have a strong deciduous element and significant numbers of sclerophyllous species. This is in response to the regional climate, which has a prolonged dry season from May to November/December, with a single rainy season December to April; annual rainfall is approximately 1,000 mm/yr.
Miombo woodland is frequent, particularly on the lower slopes away from the Mikindani sandstone. It is dominated by widespread species including Brachystegia spiciformis, Julbernardia globiflora and the heavily exploited Afzelia quanzensis, as well as the more range-restricted species Berlinia orientalis (Timberlake et al. 2010). The surrounding floodplains and gentle depressions are underlain by more recent Quaternary deposits and alluvial soils. These areas support open floodplain grassland and savanna, with dominant grasses including Panicum coloratum, Pennisetum polystachion in disturbed areas, and Hyparrhenia spp., and trees including Acacia seyal, A. sieberiana, Faidherbia albida, Kigelia africana and the palms Hyphaene compressa, Phoenix reclinata and occasional Borassus aethiopum together with seasonal wetlands (Timberlake et al. 2014). These latter areas are of lesser importance for plants but provide critical habitat for other wildlife including elephants.

Conservation issues

There is no formal conservation or biodiversity management in place at Quiterajo. The eastern portion of the site, including Namacubi Forest, was previously included within the c. 300 km2 Messalo Wilderness Area of the Maluane Conservancy (or Cabo Delgado Biodiversity and Tourism Project), a privately run tourism concession. Much of the management focus of this concession was on controlling illegal poaching, and conserving the elephant population on the Messalo floodplain, but there were also efforts to prevent illegal logging in the forests. However, activity within this concession appears to have diminished since 2012, with the Maluane Conservancy focusing more on Vamizi Island to the north (see MOZTIPA017).
The greatest threat posed to this site is from the steady immigration into northeast Cabo Delgado since the end of the post-independence civil war from the 1990s onwards. This has resulted in expansion of settlement and subsistence agriculture, increased logging of woody species for construction and charcoal and the increased frequency of wildfires set intentionally for habitat clearance and hunting (Timberlake et al. 2010). Illegal commercial logging for export is also an ongoing problem. Timberlake et al. (2014) estimate a c. 10% reduction in forest cover at Namacubi between 1999 and 2013, and encroachment into the southern portion of the forest in particular is clearly evident on satellite imagery (Google Earth 2021). A significant threat arose in the mid-2010s from the proposed construction of a new road from Mocimboa da Praia to Pemba associated with oil and gas industrial activity which would have run through the Namacubi Forest. Thankfully, this project did not proceed, and the threat appears to have abated. Current petroleum industry activity is focused on offshore liquefied natural gas (LNG) extraction further north on the Cabo Delgado coast and the impact south of Mocimboa da Praia is low at present. A violent insurgency in this region since 2017 has disrupted much of this development and has resulted in significant population displacement away from many of the local villages. However, repopulation is likely to follow any abatement of these security concerns in the future. And, should the new access road again be contemplated, the resulting influx of ribbon development and associated environmental degradation would severely threaten the existence of Namacubi Forest (J.E. Burrows, pers. comm.).
In view of its irreplaceability, formal protection of this globally important site and active management to prevent further encroachment or illegal logging should be considered a national conservation priority.

Ecosystem services

The site is primarily of importance for its habitat and biodiversity supporting services. It also provides provisioning services for local communities, including the sourcing of timber. The site has local cultural and spiritual significance, notably the sacred forest near Lake Macungue. Due to the proximity to the coast road between Pemba and Palma, this site has potential as an ecotourism destination for specialist wildlife tours. However, the current extreme security concerns (see above), together with accessibility issues because of the destruction of bridges across some of the major rivers in the area, will prevent any such ecotourism development in the short to medium term.

Site assessor(s)

Iain Darbyshire, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

IPA criterion A species

Species Qualifying sub-criterion ≥ 1% of global population ≥ 5% of national population 1 of 5 best sites nationally Entire global population Socio-economically important Abundance at site
Hexalobus mossambicensis N.Robson A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Monanthotaxis trichantha (Diels) Verdc. A(i) False True True False False Unknown
Xylopia tenuipetala D.M.Johnson & Goyder A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Stylochaeton euryphyllus Mildbr. A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Stylochaeton tortispathus Bogner & Haigh A(i) True True True True False Scarce
Nectaropetalum carvalhoi Engl. A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Croton kilwae Radcl.-Sm. A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Acacia latispina J.E.Burrows & S.M.Burrows A(i) True True True False False Occasional
Berlinia orientalis Brenan A(i) True True True False False Frequent
Micklethwaitia carvalhoi (Harms) G.P.Lewis & Schrire A(i) True True True False True Frequent
Orthosiphon scedastophyllus A.J.Paton A(iv) True True True False False Unknown
Vitex carvalhi Gürke A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Vitex mossambicensis Gürke A(i) True True True False False Frequent
Grewia limae Wild A(i) True True True False False Scarce
Memecylon aenigmaticum R.D.Stone A(i) True True True True False Occasional
Memecylon rovumense R.D.Stone & I.G.Mona A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Memecylon torrei A.Fern. & R.Fern. A(i) True True True False False Common
Warneckea albiflora R.D.Stone & N.P.Tenza A(i) True True True True False Unknown
Warneckea cordiformis R.D.Stone A(i) True True True True False Frequent
Chassalia colorata J.E.Burrows A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Leptactina papyrophloea Verdc. A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Oxyanthus strigosus Bridson & J.E.Burrows A(i) True True True False False Scarce
Pavetta lindina Bremek. A(i) True True True False False Scarce
Psydrax micans (Bullock) Bridson A(i) False False True False False Unknown
Tricalysia schliebenii Robbr. A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Tricalysia semidecidua Bridson A(i) True True True False False Occasional
Guibourtia schliebenii (Harms) J.Leonard A(i) True True True False False Abundant
Millettia impressa Harms subsp. goetzeana (Harms) J.B.Gillett A(i) False True True False False Unknown
Premna schliebenii Werderm. A(i) False True True False False Unknown
Sterculia schliebenii Mildbr. A(i) False True True False False Unknown
Vismia pauciflora Milne-Redh. A(i) True True True False False Unknown
Drypetes sclerophylla Mildbr. A(i) True True True False False Occasional
Zanthoxylum lindense (Engl.) Kokwaro A(i) True True True False False Scarce
Vepris sansibarensis (Engl.) Mziray A(i) False True True False False Unknown
Mildbraedia carpinifolia (Pax) Hutch. A(i) False True True False False Common
Acacia latistipulata Harms A(i) True True True False False Frequent
Vismianthus punctatus Mildbr. A(i) True True True False False Occasional
Omphalea mansfeldiana Mildbr. A(i) True True True False False Scarce
Strychnos xylophylla Gilg A(i) False True True False False Scarce

Hexalobus mossambicensis N.Robson

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Monanthotaxis trichantha (Diels) Verdc.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Xylopia tenuipetala D.M.Johnson & Goyder

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Stylochaeton euryphyllus Mildbr.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Stylochaeton tortispathus Bogner & Haigh

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
True
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

Nectaropetalum carvalhoi Engl.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Croton kilwae Radcl.-Sm.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Acacia latispina J.E.Burrows & S.M.Burrows

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Occasional

Berlinia orientalis Brenan

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Frequent

Micklethwaitia carvalhoi (Harms) G.P.Lewis & Schrire

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
True
Abundance at site:
Frequent

Orthosiphon scedastophyllus A.J.Paton

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(iv)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Vitex carvalhi Gürke

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Vitex mossambicensis Gürke

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Frequent

Grewia limae Wild

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

Memecylon aenigmaticum R.D.Stone

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
True
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Occasional

Memecylon rovumense R.D.Stone & I.G.Mona

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Memecylon torrei A.Fern. & R.Fern.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Common

Warneckea albiflora R.D.Stone & N.P.Tenza

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
True
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Warneckea cordiformis R.D.Stone

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
True
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Frequent

Chassalia colorata J.E.Burrows

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Leptactina papyrophloea Verdc.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Oxyanthus strigosus Bridson & J.E.Burrows

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

Pavetta lindina Bremek.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

Psydrax micans (Bullock) Bridson

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
False
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Tricalysia schliebenii Robbr.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Tricalysia semidecidua Bridson

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Occasional

Guibourtia schliebenii (Harms) J.Leonard

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Abundant

Millettia impressa Harms subsp. goetzeana (Harms) J.B.Gillett

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Premna schliebenii Werderm.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Sterculia schliebenii Mildbr.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Vismia pauciflora Milne-Redh.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Drypetes sclerophylla Mildbr.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Occasional

Zanthoxylum lindense (Engl.) Kokwaro

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

Vepris sansibarensis (Engl.) Mziray

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Unknown

Mildbraedia carpinifolia (Pax) Hutch.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Common

Acacia latistipulata Harms

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Frequent

Vismianthus punctatus Mildbr.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Occasional

Omphalea mansfeldiana Mildbr.

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
True
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

Strychnos xylophylla Gilg

Qualifying sub-criterion:
A(i)
≥ 1% of global population:
False
≥ 5% of national population:
True
1 of 5 best sites nationally:
True
Entire global population:
False
Socio-economically important:
False
Abundance at site:
Scarce

IPA criterion C qualifying habitats

Habitat Qualifying sub-criterion ≥ 5% of national resource ≥ 10% of national resource 1 of 5 best sites nationally Areal coverage at site
Rovuma Coastal Dry Forest C(iii) False True True 35
Rovuma Micklethwaitia Coastal Dry Forest C(iii) False False True 1

Rovuma Coastal Dry Forest

Qualifying sub-criterion:
C(iii)
≥ 5% of national resource:
False
≥ 10% of national resource:
True
Areal coverage at site:
35

Rovuma Micklethwaitia Coastal Dry Forest

Qualifying sub-criterion:
C(iii)
≥ 5% of national resource:
False
≥ 10% of national resource:
False
Areal coverage at site:
1

General site habitats

General site habitat Percent coverage Importance
Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Dry Forest No value Major
Savanna - Moist Savanna No value Major
Shrubland - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Shrubland No value Major
Grassland - Subtropical/Tropical Seasonally Wet/Flooded Lowland Grassland No value Minor

Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Dry Forest

Percent coverage:
No value
Importance:
Major

Savanna - Moist Savanna

Percent coverage:
No value
Importance:
Major

Shrubland - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Shrubland

Percent coverage:
No value
Importance:
Major

Grassland - Subtropical/Tropical Seasonally Wet/Flooded Lowland Grassland

Percent coverage:
No value
Importance:
Minor

Land use types

Land use type Percent coverage Importance
Harvesting of wild resources No value Minor
Agriculture (arable) No value Minor

Harvesting of wild resources

Percent coverage:
No value
Importance:
Minor

Agriculture (arable)

Percent coverage:
No value
Importance:
Minor

Threats

Threat Severity Timing
Transportation & service corridors - Roads & railroads Unknown Past, not likely to return
Biological resource use - Gathering terrestrial plants Medium Ongoing - increasing
Agriculture & aquaculture - Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Medium Ongoing - trend unknown
Natural system modifications - Fire & fire suppression - Increase in fire frequency/intensity Medium Ongoing - trend unknown

Transportation & service corridors - Roads & railroads

Severity:
Unknown
Timing:
Past, not likely to return

Biological resource use - Gathering terrestrial plants

Severity:
Medium
Timing:
Ongoing - increasing

Agriculture & aquaculture - Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming

Severity:
Medium
Timing:
Ongoing - trend unknown

Natural system modifications - Fire & fire suppression - Increase in fire frequency/intensity

Severity:
Medium
Timing:
Ongoing - trend unknown

Conservation designation

Designation name Protected area Relationship with IPA Areal overlap
Quiterajo Key Biodiversity Area protected/conservation area encompasses IPA No value

Quiterajo

Protected area:
Key Biodiversity Area
Relationship with IPA:
protected/conservation area encompasses IPA
Areal overlap:
No value

Management type

Management type Description Year started Year finished
No management plan in place No value No value

No management plan in place

Year started:
No value
Year finished:
No value

Bibliography

Darbyshire, I., Timberlake, J., Osborne, J., Rokni, S., Matimele, H., Langa, C., Datizua, C., de Sousa, C., Alves, T., Massingue, A., Hadj-Hammou, J., Dhanda, S., Shah, T. & Wursten, B., 2019

The endemic plants of Mozambique: diversity and conservation status

PhytoKeys, Vol 136, page(s) 45-96 Available online

Burrows, J., Burrows, S., Lötter, M. & Schmidt, E., 2018

Trees and Shrubs Mozambique

Timberlake, J., Goyder, D., Crawford, F. & Pascal, O., 2010

Coastal Dry Forests in Cabo Delgado Province, Northern Mozambique: Botany and Conservation.

Google Earth, 2020

Google Earth Satellite Imagery

Available online

Burrows, J.E. & Timberlake, J.R., 2011

Mozambique’s centres of endemism, with special reference to the Rovuma Centre of Endemism of NE Mozambique and SE Tanzania.

South African Journal of Botany, Vol 77, page(s) 518

Timberlake, J., Goyder, D., Crawford, F., Burrows, J.E., Clarke, G.P., Luke, Q., Matimele, H., Müller, T., Pascal, O., de Sousa, C. & Alves T., 2011

Coastal dry forests in northern Mozambique.

Plant Ecology and Evolution, Vol 144, page(s) 126-137

Timberlake, J., Matimele, H. & Massingue, A., 2014

Environmental assessment of proposed road alignment – Pemba to Mocimboa da Praia, northern Mozambique: plants and vegetation.

Degreef, J., 2006

Revision of continental African Tarenna (Rubiaceae-Pavetteae).

Opera Botanica Belgica, Vol 14, page(s) 1-150

Recommended citation

Iain Darbyshire (2024) Tropical Important Plant Areas Explorer: Quiterajo (Mozambique). https://tipas.kew.org/site/quiterajo-2/ (Accessed on 21/05/2024)